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Syllabus for

Academic year
FFR115 - Computational biology 2
 
Owner: FCMAS
5,0 Credits (ECTS 7,5)
Grading: TH - Five, Four, Three, Not passed
Level: C
Department: 16 - PHYSICS


Teaching language: English

Course module   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 No Sp
0199 Examination 5,0 c Grading: TH   5,0 c   Contact examiner

In programs

TTFYA ENGINEERING PHYSICS, Year 4 (elective)
FCMAS MSc PROGRAMME IN COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS, Year 1 (elective)
TKBIA BIOENGINEERING, Year 4 (elective)

Examiner:

Professor  Bernhard Mehlig



Eligibility:

For single subject courses within Chalmers programmes the same eligibility requirements apply, as to the programme(s) that the course is part of.

Aim

The aim of the course is to give a basic understanding of computational biology and theoretical models in molecular and cell biology. The course gives an introduction to molecular and cell biology and attempts to give an insight into the basic biological questions driving research in the field. Methods for storage, search, prediction and analysis of information from biological experiments are studied. Physical modelling of systems in cell and molecular biology will be a focus of the course, with applications to the origin of life and prebiotic evolution, and to simple physical models of the structure and function of biological macromolecules (for example protein folding and RNA structure). The course also deals with how information theory, adaptive algorithms such as neural networks and genetic algorithms and the theory of complexity of algorithms can be used in computational biology.The aim of the course is to give a basic understanding of computational biology and theoretical models in molecular and cell biology. The course gives an introduction to molecular and cell biology and attempts to give an insight into the basic biological questions driving research in the field. Methods for storage, search, prediction and analysis of information from biological experiments are studied. Physical modelling of systems in cell and molecular biology will be a focus of the course, with applications to the origin of life and prebiotic evolution, and to simple physical models of the structure and function of biological macromolecules (for example protein folding and RNA structure). The course also deals with how information theory, adaptive algorithms such as neural networks and genetic algorithms and the theory of complexity of algorithms can be used in computational biology.

Content

The main topics of the course are
- introduction to molecular and cell biology
- algorithms for database search, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic analysis.
- Models of 3-d structure and function of biological macromolecules.
- Databases and Internet resources for biological information
- The genome as a dynamical system, gene regulation
- Models of the origin of life - quasispecies, hypercycles, autocatalytic sets, the RNA world
- DNA computing

Literature

Recommended literature
B.C. Alberts et al, Molecular Biology of the Cell, Ingram International, 1994.
Joao Meidanis and Joao Carlos Setubal, Introduction to Computational Molecular Biology, PWS Publishing, 1997. Michael S: Waterman, Introduction to Computational Biology: Maps, Sequences, and Genomes, Chapman & Hall, 1995.

Examination

Oral and written presentation of projects during the course.


Page manager Published: Thu 03 Nov 2022.