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Syllabus for

Academic year
FFR160 - Sustainable development
Hållbar utveckling
 
Syllabus adopted 2021-02-11 by Head of Programme (or corresponding)
Owner: MPTSE
7,5 Credits
Grading: TH - Pass with distinction (5), Pass with credit (4), Pass (3), Fail
Education cycle: Second-cycle
Major subject: Energy and Environmental Systems and Technology, Industrial Engineering and Management
Department: 70 - SPACE, EARTH AND ENVIRONMENT


Teaching language: English
Application code: 28116
Open for exchange students: No
Block schedule: B
Maximum participants: 100
Status, available places (updated regularly): The course round is full

Module   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 Summer course No Sp
0104 Examination 7,5c Grading: TH   7,5c   25 Oct 2021 am J,  03 Jan 2022 am J,  17 Aug 2022 am J

In programs

MPTSE INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (compulsory)
MPPDE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (elective)
MPPDE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPSES SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (compulsory elective)
MPSES SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (compulsory elective)
MPSYS SYSTEMS, CONTROL AND MECHATRONICS, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)

Examiner:

Göran Berndes

  Go to Course Homepage


Eligibility

General entry requirements for Master's level (second cycle)
Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling the requirements above.

Specific entry requirements

English 6 (or by other approved means with the equivalent proficiency level)
Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling the requirements above.

Course specific prerequisites

Previous studies in environmental sciences/engineering and sustainable development.

Aim

The aim of this course is to give students the opportunity to acquire a systems perspective on society of today, and based on this develop their insights into restrictions and possibilities that follow from the need to transform the industrial society to conform to a sustainable development. Besides attaining knowledge of the concept of sustainable development, including different perspectives on this concept, students will learn about the consequences of societal resource use, and about strategies for changing this use into a more sustainable direction.

Learning outcomes (after completion of the course the student should be able to)

  • Account for the meaning of sustainable development and its three principal dimensions: the ecological, the economic and the social dimension, including intergenerational justice;
  • use a systems perspective, to describe sustainability challenges and possibilities for major technical systems and for their transformation to meet sustainability requirements;
  • account for major restrictions and options for the use of resources and technologies from the standpoint of sustainable development;
  • account for, on a basic level, socially and economically related conflicts of interests that may block implementation of sustainable development;
  • account for strategies, international agreements and major policy instruments for a sustainable use of resources and ecosystem services;
  • account for relevant analytical concepts, and have the capability to use these for analyzing issues related to sustainable development;
  • account for basic ethical theory and apply it to analyze arguments and decisions on issues of sustainability.

Content

The course starts with a block of lectures giving perspectives on the concept sustainable development and on Man's interaction with nature from a historical perspective. Environmental ethics and intergenerational justice are discussed. After this, lectures are dedicated to the concept of industrial ecology, providing systems perspectives on human-nature interactions and the societal metabolism in a sustainable development perspective. A second block of lectures concerns sustainable use of land and other resources, including agriculture and forestry, sustainable energy systems, as well as sustainable materials systems. Specific lectures are also dedicated to sustainable development and technical change, and to climate agreements and connected international processes. In a third block of lectures - working for sustainability - guest lecturers present their own experience of working for sustainability in various functions in society. Earlier themes include environmental diplomacy and climate negotiations, work on eco-labeling, sustainability certification of forestry, and Agenda 21 work in Göteborg.

Organisation

Lectures and seminars are part of the course. The seminars provide opportunities for the students to discuss and learn more about specific topics of relevance for sustainable development. The students prepare for the seminars by completing tasks that are distributed by the teacher during the weeks before the seminars.

Literature

"Sustainable development : nuances and perspectives" by Fredrik Hedenus, Martin Persson & Frances Sprei (Studentlitteratur) plus additional literature available through the course homepage

Examination including compulsory elements

Written examination. The seminars are compulsory and the students have to hand in reports connected to the seminar preparations.

The course examiner may assess individual students in other ways than what is stated above if there are special reasons for doing so, for example if a student has a decision from Chalmers on educational support due to disability.


Page manager Published: Mon 28 Nov 2016.