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Syllabus for

Academic year
TEK680 - Circular economy
Cirkulär ekonomi
 
Syllabus adopted 2020-02-10 by Head of Programme (or corresponding)
Owner: MPTSE
7,5 Credits
Grading: TH - Pass with distinction (5), Pass with credit (4), Pass (3), Fail
Education cycle: Second-cycle
Major subject: Energy and Environmental Systems and Technology
Department: 45 - TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT AND ECONOMICS

The course is full. For waiting list, please contact the director of studies: johan.bankel@chalmers.se
Teaching language: English
Application code: 28112
Open for exchange students: Yes
Block schedule: A
Maximum participants: 50

Module   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 Summer course No Sp
0119 Examination 7,5c Grading: TH   7,5c   26 Oct 2020 pm L   07 Jan 2021 am L,  18 Aug 2021 pm L

In programs

MPAEM MATERIALS ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPDES INDUSTRIAL DESIGN ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPPEN PRODUCTION ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPSES SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPTSE INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPTSE INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (compulsory elective)
MPMAR MARITIME MANAGEMENT, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)

Examiner:

Maria Ljunggren

  Go to Course Homepage


Eligibility

General entry requirements for Master's level (second cycle)
Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling the requirements above.

Specific entry requirements

English 6 (or by other approved means with the equivalent proficiency level)
Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling the requirements above.

Course specific prerequisites

Basic university-level knowledge in environmental science or environmental engineering.

Aim

The course aims to provide students with a rich understanding of the merits and challenges of transitioning to a more resource-efficient and circular economy. Drawing from multiple disciplines, including engineering, management and sustainability sciences, students gain knowledge on underlying principles and visions as well as theory and tools that support the formulation and assessment of resource-efficient and circular measures. By exploring real-world examples, students synthesize and apply the knowledge gained.

Learning outcomes (after completion of the course the student should be able to)

  • Describe historic and future projections of natural resource use and associated sustainability challenges.
  •  Describe visions and underlying principles of various approaches to resource-efficiency and circular economy.
  • Critically discuss the implications of increased resource-efficiency and circularity for sustainable development.
  • Account for actors, their options, barriers and drivers for transitioning to a more resource-efficient and circular economy.
  • Account for resource-efficient and circular physical measures, their potential benefits and limitations.
  • Formulate measures towards increased resource-efficiency and circularity based on relevant theories, methods and tools from multiple disciplines.
  • Assess measures towards increased resource-efficiency and circularity based on relevant theories, methods and tools from multiple disciplines.
  • Communicate orally and in writing the knowledge and skills acquired.

Content

A more circular economy is suggested as an essential contribution to a more sustainable, low carbon, resource-efficient and competitive economy. Measures over the full life cycle - from design and production to use, reuse, repair, remanufacturing and recycling - are suggested as a way of maintaining the value of products, components, materials and elements for as long as possible. This may also create new opportunities for and requirements on businesses, users and policy makers across various stages of the value chain.
The course aims to provide a rich understanding of the circular economy, its opportunities and limitations as well as concrete examples of resource-efficient and circular solutions put into practice. It covers theory, methods and tools from product design, production engineering, waste management, industrial ecology, supply chain management and public policy, presented in the context of the circular economy. Intended for students from various disciplines, it encourages a combination previous and new knowledge into a comprehensive understanding of the circular economy.
Consisting of four themes, the first one presents roots, rationales and core elements of resource-efficiency and the circular economy. Applying a systems perspective, both physical resource flows and actors are traced over life cycles including options for and implications of change. The second theme addresses design, manufacturing, use, reuse, repair, remanufacturing, recycling and waste management. The third theme deals with managing change in business and through public policy. As a parallel fourth theme, real-world examples of resource-efficient and circular solutions are explored through various disciplinary lenses, aiming for gradual synthesis and application of the course content.

Organisation

The course is comprised by a series of lectures given by lecturers from various disciplines and by invited guests from industry and authorities. There are several major stand-alone exercises as well as shorter ones integrated in the lectures. A larger project is conducted in multi-disciplinary groups. Attendance at certain compulsory course activities is required to pass the course.

Literature

The literature is a collection of articles and reports available electronically at Chalmers library, google scholar or at the course website. All lectures slides (including guests) are part of the course requirements. The literature is announced at the course website no later than two weeks before the course starts.

Examination including compulsory elements

The examination of the course comprises of an individual written exam, written and oral presentation of the group project and individual tasks. The final course grade is determined by the exam and the group project results. Attendance at certain compulsory course activities is required to pass the course.


Page manager Published: Mon 28 Nov 2016.