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Syllabus for

Academic year
KLI011 - Food chemistry
Livsmedelskemi
 
Syllabus adopted 2017-02-20 by Head of Programme (or corresponding)
Owner: MPBIO
7,5 Credits
Grading: TH - Pass with distinction (5), Pass with credit (4), Pass (3), Fail
Education cycle: Second-cycle
Major subject: Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering
Department: 28 - BIOLOGY AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING


Teaching language: English
Application code: 08126
Open for exchange students: Yes
Maximum participants: 30

Module   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 Summer course No Sp
0107 Examination 7,5c Grading: TH   7,5c   13 Jan 2021 pm J   Contact examiner,  Contact examiner

In programs

MPBIO BIOTECHNOLOGY, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (compulsory elective)
MPBIO BIOTECHNOLOGY, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPBME BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPISC INNOVATIVE AND SUSTAINABLE CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPISC INNOVATIVE AND SUSTAINABLE CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (elective)

Examiner:

Ingrid Undeland

  Go to Course Homepage


Eligibility

General entry requirements for Master's level (second cycle)
Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling the requirements above.

Specific entry requirements

English 6 (or by other approved means with the equivalent proficiency level)
Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling the requirements above.

Course specific prerequisites

Undergraduate profile (BSc) with courses in chemistry, including inorganic, physical and organic chemistry; and biochemistry.

Aim

Food chemistry deals with the chemical, physical and functional properties of food constituents and the chemical changes these constituents undergo during handling, processing and storage including those that limit food shelf life. Food chemistry is a major aspect of Food science, that is an interdisciplinary subject in which the engineering, biological, and physical sciences are used to study the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods from a consumer and sustainability perspective. The aim of the course is to provide the students with a deep understanding of how food components contributes to overall quality of foods; and to enable students to evaluate and explain how the highly complex nature of food may result in a multitude of desired and undesired reactions which are controlled by a variety of parameters.

Learning outcomes (after completion of the course the student should be able to)

The students will be trained to understand and discuss the main principles, theories and concepts underlying established knowledge in food chemistry. On completing this course, students should be able to:


  • describe reactions and mechanisms important in food chemistry
  • explain the chemistry of the most important food components, including their properties and reactions
  • develop and distinguish how individual food components contributes to the overall quality of foods
  • explain the major chemical reactions that occur during food handling, processing and storage, including those that limit food shelf life
  • demonstrate knowledge on the relationship of chemical markers and key chemical compounds that relate flavour and colour attributes to thermal processing, chemical reactions (e.g. oxidative changes, Maillard reaction) and product quality
  • demonstrate sufficient knowledge of food chemistry to control reactions in foods.
  • implement a selection of laboratory techniques common to basic and applied food chemistry
  • apply their knowledge and laboratory skills to measure, control and modify the chemical and physical properties of food
  • explain the principles behind some of the most common analytical techniques used in food analysis (primarily chemical and physical analyses)
  • be capable of designing and conducting experiments and interpreting data to understand important food chemistry principles
  • In oral presentations, debate and written documentation, discuss and critically analyse literature data and food product information within a selected food chemistry topic.
  • seek and acquire information, and to conduct independent studies in order to advance the personal knowledge within the area
  • based on study vist(s), have brief knowledge about how a food production company operates.

Content

The course includes lectures with the following content:

  1. Water and its interaction with food components and food stability
  2. Carbohydrates:
    Mono-, di-, oligo-, and polysaccharides
    Decomposition - reducing and non-reducing sugars
    Starch - granule structure and properties, native and modified
    Heteropolysaccharides - pectic substances and seed gums
    Sweeteners
  3. Lipids:
    Fatty acids and triglycerides
    Phospholipids
    Lipid oxidation (rancidity)
    Rancidity - hydrolytic and oxidative
    Hydrogenation - mechanisms and catalysts, trans fatty acids
    Interesterification
    Polymorphism
    Synthetic fats
  4. Proteins:
    Amino acid chemistry
    Protein structure
    Protein changes during processing
    Vegetable, milk, cheese and meat/fish proteins
  5. Browning reactions:
    Maillard reaction - formation and control
    Enzymatic browning
  6. Emulsions
  7. Colours and colorants
  8. Food additives
  9. Flavours
  10. Toxic substances
  11. Biopolymer structures

Compulsory parts:

  1. Laboratory practicals will cover topics such as, Lipid oxidation, Enzymatic browning of vegetables and fruits, Protein processing.
  2. Seminar work where the students should critically go in depht within a food chemistry topic.The outcome should be presented in an oral presentation and a written documentation.

Organisation

The course includes lectures, compulsory laboratory exercises and seminar work.

Literature

Food: the Chemistry of Its Components, 6th ed. T.P. Coultate (2015), The Royal Society of Chemists (RSC), Cambridge, UK. (ebook via Chalmers library).
Handouts of lecture notes and scientific literature.

Examination including compulsory elements

The examination is based on a written exam, approved laboratory exercises, and an oral and written presentation of the seminar work.


Published: Mon 28 Nov 2016.