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Syllabus for

Academic year
ESS101 - Modelling and simulation  
Modellering och simulering
 
Syllabus adopted 2018-02-13 by Head of Programme (or corresponding)
Owner: MPSYS
7,5 Credits
Grading: TH - Five, Four, Three, Fail
Education cycle: Second-cycle
Major subject: Automation and Mechatronics Engineering, Electrical Engineering
Department: 32 - ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


Teaching language: English
Open for exchange students: Yes
Block schedule: A+

Course module   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 Summer course No Sp
0107 Examination 4,5c Grading: TH   4,5c   31 Oct 2018 am L,  09 Jan 2019 pm M   26 Aug 2019 am SB_MU  
0207 Laboratory 3,0c Grading: UG   3,0c    

In programs

MPAUT AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPBME BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (compulsory)
MPEPO ELECTRIC POWER ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (elective)
MPEPO ELECTRIC POWER ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPSYS SYSTEMS, CONTROL AND MECHATRONICS, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (compulsory)

Examiner:

Sébastien Gros

Replaces

ESS100   Modelling and simulation


Eligibility:


In order to be eligible for a second cycle course the applicant needs to fulfil the general and specific entry requirements of the programme that owns the course. (If the second cycle course is owned by a first cycle programme, second cycle entry requirements apply.)
Exemption from the eligibility requirement: Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling these requirements.

Course specific prerequisites

Basic knowledge in dynamical systems, automatic control, linear transforms, mechanics and electric circuits.

Aim

Modeling and simulation are important tools supporting engineers in the development of complex systems, from early study of the system concept (when the system possibly does not exist yet) to model-based control design and optimization of system performance. Application areas where modeling and simulation are fundamental tools are, just to mention a few, control, automotive, biomedical, mechanical, chemical engineering.
The aim of the course is to provide solid theoretical basis and practical approaches to systematically develop mathematical models of engineering systems from basic physical laws and from experimental data and to use them for simulation purposes.

Learning outcomes (after completion of the course the student should be able to)

The aim of the course is introducing methods and principles to construct mathematical models of dynamical systems and numerically simulate them.


The course includes modeling methods based on basic physical principles as well as system identification, i.e., based on measured data from sensors. Numerical simulation methods are studied, with particular emphasis on accuracy and stability.



  • Use methods and tools to develop mathematical models of dynamical systems by using basic physical laws. The emphasis will be on complex mechanical systems.
  • Study advance forms of differential equations used in modeling.
  • Study the principles behind estimating parameters using data.
  • Use methods and tools to develop mathematical models of dynamical systems from measurement data.
  • Understand and implement some of the numerical methods used in simulations

Content

The course covers the following topics: 



  • Background on dynamic systems and differential equations
  • Lagrange Modeling (principles and forms)
  • Differential-Algebraic equations (definition, treatment, differential index and index reduction)
  • The Newton method
  • System identification:
    • Max-likelihood and least-squares estimation
    • Parameter estimation for dynamics systems 
  • Numerical methods for solving differential equations
    • Explicit Runge-Kutta methods. Stability and order.
    • Implicit Runge-Kutta methods. Stability and order.
  • Advanced topics: sensitivity of simulations, hybrid systems



Organisation

The course covers approximately 15 lectures, and 4 assignments.

Literature


  1. Lecture notes (under development)
  2. T. Glad, L. Ljung: Modellbygge och simulering (Studentlitteratur). English version available. - Supplementary material.
  3. Griffiths,
    Higham: Numerical Methods for Ordinary Differential Equations,
    Springer, 2010 (freely available for download from Chalmers online
    Library)



Examination including compulsory elements

Examination is based on written exam, grading scale TH, and passed assignments.


Published: Mon 28 Nov 2016.