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Syllabus for

Academic year
DAT280 - Parallel functional programming  
Parallell funktionell programmering
 
Syllabus adopted 2015-02-10 by Head of Programme (or corresponding)
Owner: MPALG
7,5 Credits
Grading: TH - Five, Four, Three, Fail
Education cycle: Second-cycle
Major subject: Computer Science and Engineering, Information Technology
Department: 37 - COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


Teaching language: English
Open for exchange students: Yes
Block schedule: C

Course elements   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 Summer course No Sp
0112 Examination 6,0c Grading: TH   6,0c   08 Jun 2019 am M   22 Aug 2019 pm J
0212 Laboratory 1,5c Grading: UG   1,5c    

In programs

MPSOF SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (compulsory elective)
MPALG COMPUTER SCIENCE - ALGORITHMS, LANGUAGES AND LOGIC, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (compulsory elective)

Examiner:

Mary Sheeran

  Go to Course Homepage


 

Eligibility:


In order to be eligible for a second cycle course the applicant needs to fulfil the general and specific entry requirements of the programme that owns the course. (If the second cycle course is owned by a first cycle programme, second cycle entry requirements apply.)
Exemption from the eligibility requirement: Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling these requirements.

Course specific prerequisites

The requirement for the course is to have successfully completed two years within the subject Computer Science or equivalent. Course participants must also have completed an introductory course in Functional programming, preferably using Haskell or Erlang. (Examples at Chalmers are TDA452 and TDA555).

Aim

The aim of the course is to introduce the principles and practice of parallel programming in a functional programming language. By parallel programming, we mean programming using multiple hardware cores or processors in order to gain speed. The course covers approaches to parallel functional programming in both Haskell and Erlang. It covers current research on these topics, and relies heavily on scientific papers as its source materials.

Learning outcomes (after completion of the course the student should be able to)

Knowledge and understanding
1. Distinguish between concurrency and parallelism.
2. Give an overview of approaches to parallelism in functional programming languages in the scientific literature.

Skills and abilities
1. Write, modify and test parallel functional programs, to run on a variety of architectures such as shared memory multiprocessors, networks of commodity servers, and GPUs.
2. Interpret parallelism profiles and address bottlenecks.

Judgement and approach
1. Identify when using a functional language may be appropriate for solving a parallel programming problem.
2. Select an appropriate form of parallel functional programming for a given problem, and expain the choice.

Content

The course covers the principles and practice of parallel programming in both Haskell and Erlang.

Advantages of functional approaches to parallelism: immutability, absence of data races, determinism.

Profiling parallel functional programs: granularity, bottlenecks, locality, data-dependencies.

Parallel functional algorithms: divide-and-conquer.

Approaches to expressing parallelism in Haskell: the Eval monad, the Par monad, parallel strategies, skeletons, data parallelism.

Functional approaches to GPU programming.

Parallelisation and distribution for Erlang. Scalability. Handling errors in a massively parallel system.

Case studies of industrial parallel functional programming, such as map-reduce and scalable no-SQL databases.

Guest lectures by leading researchers and practitioners.

Organisation

The course is given in the form of lectures by Chalmers staff and by external experts. Students complete obligatory laboratory assignments.

Literature

Selected scientific papers. See the course home page.

Examination including compulsory elements

The grade is determined by performance on a written exam. Completion of obligatory laboratory assignments is also necessary for a pass.


Published: Fri 18 Dec 2009. Modified: Mon 28 Nov 2016