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Syllabus for

Academic year
ATH100 - The city shaped  
 
Syllabus adopted 2015-02-10 by Head of Programme (or corresponding)
Owner: TKARK
7,5 Credits
Grading: UG - Fail, pass
Education cycle: First-cycle
Major subject: Architecture
Department: 55 - ARCHITECTURE


Teaching language: Swedish
Maximum participants: 207

Course module   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 Summer course No Sp
0103 Written and oral assignments 7,5 c Grading: UG   4,0 c 3,5 c    

In programs

TKARK ARCHITECTURE, Year 2 
TKARK ARCHITECTURE, Year 3 
TKMAS MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, Year 3 (elective)
TKVOV CIVIL ENGINEERING, Year 3 (elective)
MTS Humans, Technology, Society, Year 1 

Examiner:

Konstnärlig univ lektor  Johan Linton


Theme:

MTS 7,5 hec


  Go to Course Homepage

Eligibility:

In order to be eligible for a first cycle course the applicant needs to fulfil the general and specific entry requirements of the programme(s) that has the course included in the study programme.

Course specific prerequisites

Swedish.

Aim

This course provides a cultural historical orientation in the fields of architecture and urban planning¿that is, in the built environment¿and in their significance and their history.
The built environment is decidedly the most present and tangible part of what we humans use technology and culture to create for ourselves. It has far-reaching significance for our quality of life. All engineering work is either directly or indirectly integrated with the built environment, and thus exists in a state of exchange with it.
This course gives aspiring engineers and architects fundamental knowledge about the history of architecture, urban planning, and urban infrastructure and their importance to our lives today. Students are thereby given insight into potential ways of interpreting and understanding the built environment and how history and tradition have direct and indirect connections to the everyday systems on which our lives depend today.
The course gives students tools they need for future studies related to the built environment, and the basis for interdisciplinary collaboration and exchange with experts in technology, culture and other areas. In this way, the course is also relevant for issues of environmental and sustainable development and for equality issues. Students are also given a concrete opportunity to collaborate with students from other programs at Chalmers through group projects and seminars. These group projects and seminars offer students great freedom in choosing subjects for further exploration that are related to their specific areas of interest.

Learning outcomes (after completion of the course the student should be able to)

Have greater knowledge about¿
- the rich history of building that has directly and indirectly shaped the living environment for all of humanity.
Understand¿
- that the interplay between architecture, technology, and culture has been important in shaping the environments in which people live today.
- that the history of architecture and urban planning is important for understanding the present, and is something we must consider if we are to make constructive decisions about our future.
- that urban development includes caring for a historical legacy, and that it is important to ensure that caring for that legacy be a conscious part of the processes of urban development.
Have more ability to¿
- Analyze and interpret cities and architecture from a cultural historical perspective.
- Communicate (design, describe, discuss, and problematize) about analyses of and encounters with the city, its architecture, and the spaces we live in in a concrete way.

Content

1. Theory: Independent Reading and Lectures
This sub-unit includes:
- Lectures about urban development and architecture from a historical and cultural perspective.
- Independent reading of the course literature.

2. Applied Theory
This sub-unit includes:
- Two exercises in independently seeing, studying, and interpreting the built environment (individual writing assignment).
- One exercise in communicating the student's own insights with others (group presentation).

3. Writing Assignment: Building
Students must describe and interpret a building of their choice in a way that demonstrates they have learned from the lectures and course reading. They must write a personal and knowledge-rich paper (of about 8000 characters including spaces) about a building that is discussed in the main textbook for the course (Fazio et al., A World History of Architecture). They can choose a building from any era at all, but regardless of how old the building is they must try to say something about how they perceive (or think) the building relates to society and building today. This assignment includes both writing and layout, and is an exercise in conveying insights and knowledge in a competent, easily accessible, and interesting manner.

4. Writing Assignment: City
Students must describe and interpret a city of their choice in a way that demonstrates they have learned from the lectures and course reading. They must write a personal and knowledge-rich paper (of about 8000 characters including spaces) about a city where they feel at home (for example, a city where they've studied or where they grew up). This assignment includes both writing and layout, and is an exercise in conveying insights and knowledge in a competent, easily accessible, and interesting manner.

5. Seminars
Before the writing assignments are turned in, they are discussed in student groups. Everyone in the group must read all of the papers, and the group will hold its own seminar. The students then compile the views expressed about the papers and submit them in the form of a report. Then the students rework their papers with the aid of the other students' views before submitting a final draft.

6. Group Exercise
The students divide up into groups of at most six and together choose a topic to study in the city of Gothenburg. For example, the group can choose to study the everyday commute from home to school or work, analyze the city's transportation systems and infrastructure, visualize the rhythm of the city (over the course of a day), capture the character of a neighborhood, catalogue the city's furnishing details, or in some other way reflect on the life and culture of the city. The students are free to choose. It is desirable that the group puts what they learn into a larger context. They present the results of their studies to the rest of the students in the course in a 10-15 minute presentation. The format for the presentation may vary, and may include a variety of media such as text, photography, PowerPoint, drawings, film, games, theater, song, or debate. Turning their research results into an interesting and creative presentation is as important a part of the assignment as the research itself.

Organisation

This course includes lectures, reading, writing, group exercises, seminars, and an excursion around a city by bus.
The course is led by Johan Linton (PhD, architect, civil engineer in applied physics). Nationally prominent speakers on urban development will contribute as guest lecturers.

Literature

Primary textbook for the course:
Michael Fazio, Marian Moffett, Lawrence Wodehouse, A World History of Architecture (Thames and Hudson, 2013. Other editions are acceptable.)

Recommended reading for those interested in more in-depth study of Swedish cities:
Cecilia Björk, Lars Nordling, and Laila Reppen, Så byggdes staden (2nd ed 2008)

Recommended reading for those interested in more in-depth study of Gothenburg:
Claes Caldenby, Gunilla Linde Bjur, and Sven-Olof Ohlsson, Guide till Göteborgs arkitektur (Formas, 2006)

Recommended reading for those interested in more in-depth study of Swedish housing production:
Ola Nylander, Svensk bostad 1850-2000 (Studentlitteratur, 2013)

Examination

A passing grade for the course requires:
- Attendance at lectures, including the bus excursion (preferably all, but at least 8 out of 10).
- A passing grade on writing assignments.
- Active participation in the group assignment, which includes completion of a sketch exercise and attendance at the group's presentation.


Page manager Published: Mon 28 Nov 2016.