Search course

Use the search function to find more information about the study programmes and courses available at Chalmers. When there is a course homepage, a house symbol is shown that leads to this page.

Graduate courses

Departments' graduate courses for PhD-students.

​​​​
​​

Syllabus for

Academic year
AFT043 - Architecture - an introduction
Arkitektur - en introduktion
 
Syllabus adopted 2021-02-26 by Head of Programme (or corresponding)
Owner: TKARK
10,5 Credits
Grading: UG - Pass, Fail
Education cycle: First-cycle
Main field of study: Architecture
Department: 20 - ARCHITECTURE AND CIVIL ENGINEERING


Teaching language: Swedish
Application code: 45120
Open for exchange students: No
Only students with the course round in the programme plan

Module   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 Summer course No Sp
0114 Project, part A 5,0 c Grading: UG   5,0 c    
0214 Design exercise + laboratory, part B 1,5 c Grading: UG   1,5 c    
0314 Laboratory, part C 2,0 c Grading: UG   2,0 c    
0414 Laboratory, part D 2,0 c Grading: UG   2,0 c    

In programs

TKARK ARCHITECTURE, Year 1 (compulsory)

Examiner:

Björn Gross

  Go to Course Homepage

Theme:

Architectural design project 5,0 hec


Eligibility

General entry requirements for bachelor's level (first cycle)
Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling the requirements above.

Specific entry requirements

The same as for the programme that owns the course.
Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling the requirements above.

Course specific prerequisites

Swedish

Aim

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the architect's potential fields of work and to the methods of architectural study and architectural practice. The course will also present architecture as a field of knowledge and the role of the architect in society. The course includes basic level space design projects with the objective of providing insight into the fundamental importance of the sketch, the model, and the working drawing for our understanding of space, for problem solving, and for communication.
Students will be challenged to discover and develop their own repertoire of research and design methods, which they can use to help improve their ability to communicate and understand representations of architecture in two and three dimensions.
The purpose of the design project is to provide an introduction to seeing and thinking about space, and training students to have a feeling for the design of spaces in relation to climate, construction, and landscape. We discuss space based on the following premises: space/climate, space/construction, and space/landscape.

Learning outcomes (after completion of the course the student should be able to)


INTRODUCTION AND DESIGN STUDIO (5.0 credits)
(Part A: Design Studio)
Be aware of the pedagogical principles of architectural education.
Be aware of different fields of work in the architectural profession.
Be familiar with the components of the degree program.
Be familiar with the objectives, organization, and structure of the program.
Develop methods for leading their own studies.
Refer to basic spatial concepts.
Understand the basics of how space is formed and designed.
Refer to basic knowledge of landscape characterization and analysis.
Apply basic methods of landscape characterization.
Make a reasoned argument about spaces in landscapes and buildings.
Make a reasoned argument about the built spaces and the users.

SPACE, CLIMATE, AND CONSTRUCTION (1.5 credits)
(Part B: Construction Exercise and Experiment)
Understand the importance of climate and construction for the design and building of spaces.

THE LANGUAGE AND TOOLS OF DRAWING AND MODELING (2 credits)
(Part C: Experiment)
Refer to the basic concepts of the sketching process as a design method.
Use sketching as a method in free-hand drawing, drafting, and physical modeling.
Execute basic architectural working drawings (plans, sections, and elevations).
Read and interpret a working drawing.

COLOR, FORM, AND VISUALIZATION (2 credits)
(Part D: Experiment)
Understand the basics of perspective.
Draw free-hand perspectives.
Understand that the experience of architecture can be captured and described with forms of expression other than drawings, including free-hand perspectives, sketching, colour and light studies.

Content


INTRODUCTION AND DESIGN STUDIO (5.0 credits)
(Part A: Design Studio)
In lectures and seminars we present the role of the architect in urban development, social issues, and art, as well as the organization and study methods for the entire architectural degree program. We present the architect's various fields of work and the evolution of the architect's role through lectures by practicing architects as well as teachers and researchers on the school's faculty.
Through different exercises students develop designs for spaces in the landscape, what values can be created in relationship with target groups and function. In working with the design task, students acquire expertise in climate, landscape analysis, and presentations. Student projects are developed with instruction from practicing architects and teachers. The course concludes with a critique and reflection on the process and the values that has been created.

SPACE, CLIMATE, AND CONSTRUCTION (1.5 credits)
(Part B: Construction exercise and experiment)
In lectures we address space, climate, and construction as conditions for architectural design. The physical model is used as the point of departure for a construction exercise. The basis of leadership and value creation is discussed and tested by students during their design studio work. In the individual exercises and the group work laboration students acquire practical expertise on space, climate, and construction. The exercise concludes with a reflection about the process and what values that has been created.

THE LANGUAGE AND TOOLS OF DRAWING AND MODELING (2 credits)
(Part C: Experiment)
In lectures and exercises students are introduced to and trained in methods and tools used in design studio work.

COLOR, FORM, AND VISUALIZATION (2 credits)
(Part D: Experiment)
In lectures and exercises students are introduced to and trained in methods and tools. In free-hand drawings, model studies, and other methods, students practice designing spaces and volumes and develop the ability to depict light, color, and material.

Organisation

The course is taught and led by a teaching team. Exercises and experiments are closely linked to students' design studio work. The course is made up of lectures, seminars, exercises, experiments, design studio with instruction and critique, and reflection and evaluation. Design presentations and reflections are documented in a portfolio. Dairy notations and weekly reflections are the base for the concluding reflection.

Literature

Om arkitektur (ur ett pågående samtal)
Editors: Claes Caldenby, Fredrik Nilsson Published: 201110
Den sökande skissen by Arne Branzell
Arkitektens handbook by Anders Bodin, Jacob Hidemark, Martin Stintzing, Sven Nyström
Retorikens Kraft by Josefin Karlsson, Studentlitteratur utgiven 2017

Examination including compulsory elements

A passing grade requires 80% attendance, presentation and approval of exercises, active participation in design studio (conversations with studio assistants), completed and approved design studio project, and presentation of reflections on the process. Students are evaluated on the exercises and critique they turn in. Design project presentations and reflections must be documented in a portfolio.

If the result is not considered as a pass in the course, then supplementation must be completed in accordance to written instructions and assessed in the next subsequent re-examination period. If this primary supplementation does not result in a pass and further supplementation is then required, this will also be notified in writing. This secondary supplementation will be assessed in the subsequent re-examination period. If the additions are then not deemed sufficient for passing the course, the course should be retaken.

The course examiner may assess individual students in other ways than what is stated above if there are special reasons for doing so, for example if a student has a decision from Chalmers on educational support due to disability.


Page manager Published: Thu 04 Feb 2021.