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Graduate courses

Departments' graduate courses for PhD-students.

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Syllabus for

Academic year
MMA161 - Ship resistance and computational hydrodynamic
 
Syllabus adopted 2014-02-20 by Head of Programme (or corresponding)
Owner: MPNAV
7,5 Credits
Grading: TH - Five, Four, Three, Not passed
Education cycle: Second-cycle
Major subject: Mechanical Engineering, Shipping and Marine Technology
Department: 48 - SHIPPING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY


Teaching language: English
Open for exchange students
Block schedule: C
Maximum participants: 50

Course module   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 Summer course No Sp
0111 Examination 7,5 c Grading: TH   7,5 c   13 Jan 2015 am L,  13 Apr 2015 am L,  25 Aug 2015 pm L

In programs

MPNAV NAVAL ARCHITECTURE AND OCEAN ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 1 (compulsory)

Examiner:

Professor  Rickard Bensow


Replaces

MMA155   Ship resistance and propulsion MMA160   Computational hydrodynamics and optimisation

Course evaluation:

http://document.chalmers.se/doc/4218d5bb-2b55-4a4c-b024-a4a7e21b9340


  Go to Course Homepage

Eligibility:


In order to be eligible for a second cycle course the applicant needs to fulfil the general and specific entry requirements of the programme that owns the course. (If the second cycle course is owned by a first cycle programme, second cycle entry requirements apply.)
Exemption from the eligibility requirement: Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling these requirements.

Course specific prerequisites

Mathematics (including mathematical statistics, numerical analysis and multi-variable calculus), Mechanics and strength of material and Engineering materials.

Aim

After finishing the course, the student will have basic professional knowledge in ship hydrodynamics and know the principles for designing an efficient hull. The student will have competence to set up, including the proper choice of tools and approximations, solve and analyse flow problems relating to hull resistance.

Learning outcomes (after completion of the course the student should be able to)

After finishing the course, the student will have professional knowledge in ship hydrodynamics and know the principles for designing an efficient hull. The student will have competence to set up, including the proper choice of tools and approximations, solve and analyse flow problems relating to hull resistance. 

The student should be able to:
  • Identify and discuss the resistance components, and their origin, of a ship hull;
  • Understand and discuss the concept of scale similarity;
  • Use the ITTC procedures to transform the hydrodynamic characteristics of a ship between model and full scale;
  • Understand and discuss how different computational approaches for resistance can be used;
  • Critically evaluate results from different computational approaches;
  • Determine ship resistance by use of potential flow methods;
  • Determine ship resistance by use of RANS methods;
  • Determine ship resistance by use of empirical methods;
  • Understand and discuss the effects of interaction between hull and propulsor and how this affects the hull design;
  • Evaluate how different design changes of the hull will affect the resistance.

Content

The course content can be classified into three different parts: (i) the origin, classification, and analysis of the different components of the resistance, (ii) the determination of resistance components through computational hydrodynamics, experiments in towing basins, or by empirical consideration, and (iii) the principles of hull design and tools to improve the efficiency of the design. Practical assignments using modern commercial software as well as towing tests results are used to exemplify the theoretical content of the course.
  • Resistance components
    • Basic equations and principles in ship hydrodynamics
    • Scale similarity concept
    • Classification of resistance components
    • Ship wave making resistance
    • Inviscid flow
    • Boundary layer flow
    • Viscous flow and turbulence
  • Resistance prediction
    • Panel methods for inviscid flow
    • RANS approaches for turbulent flow computations
    • Empirical methods for resistance prediction
    • Experimental procedures for resistance prediction
  • Hull design
    • Resistance of different hull types
    • Design considerations for resistance reduction
    • Design considerations for propulsor-hull interaction


Organisation

Teaching is in the form of lectures and computer assignments.

Literature

J.R. Paulling, Ed. (2010). The Principles of Naval Architecture Series ¿ Ship Resistance and Flow. The Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME), Jersey City, NJ, USA.

Examination

Written exam, passed computer assignments, and seminar discussion on computer assignment results.


Page manager Published: Thu 04 Feb 2021.