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Graduate courses

Departments' graduate courses for PhD-students.

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Syllabus for

Academic year
RRY025 - Image processing
 
Syllabus adopted 2014-02-12 by Head of Programme (or corresponding)
Owner: MPWPS
7,5 Credits
Grading: TH - Five, Four, Three, Not passed
Education cycle: Second-cycle
Major subject: Electrical Engineering, Engineering Physics
Department: 75 - EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCES


Teaching language: English
Open for exchange students
Block schedule: C

Course module   Credit distribution   Examination dates
Sp1 Sp2 Sp3 Sp4 Summer course No Sp
0107 Examination 7,5c Grading: TH   7,5c   30 Oct 2014 pm M,  05 Jan 2015 pm V,  21 Aug 2015 pm V

In programs

MPBME BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPCAS COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPCOM COMMUNICATION ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (compulsory elective)
MPPAS PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)
MPWPS WIRELESS, PHOTONICS AND SPACE ENGINEERING, MSC PROGR, Year 2 (elective)

Examiner:

Docent  Alessandro Romeo


Course evaluation:

http://document.chalmers.se/doc/b9424116-46c3-475c-8816-f4e6568766ce


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Eligibility:


In order to be eligible for a second cycle course the applicant needs to fulfil the general and specific entry requirements of the programme that owns the course. (If the second cycle course is owned by a first cycle programme, second cycle entry requirements apply.)
Exemption from the eligibility requirement: Applicants enrolled in a programme at Chalmers where the course is included in the study programme are exempted from fulfilling these requirements.

Course specific prerequisites

Basic knowledge in mathematics and programming skills.

Aim

The aim of this course is for students to become familiar with a wide variety of techniques in modern Image Processing. These techniques can be used to subjectively improve image quality for the end-user (image enhancement), remove known image distortions (image restoration) and to reduce image data sizes for storage or transmission (image compression). These techniques are valuable in a range of applications and careers including, but not limited to, medical imaging, astronomy, remote sensing, automation etc. Stress is placed on deep understanding of the principles underlying the techniques rather than memory learning of algorithms.

Learning outcomes (after completion of the course the student should be able to)


  • Visualise via means of mental images the process of forming 1D and 2D Fourier transforms and also the convolution process. Describe the similarities and differences between the continuous and discrete Fourier transforms and their inter-relationship.

  • Select and apply appropriate image enhancement methods for different applications. Discriminate between cases where automated image enhancement methods produce appropriate results and where they do not.

  • Understand the differences between averaging and median filtering for reducing image noise.

  • Demonstrate understanding of image smoothing and sharpening in both the image and Fourier domains. Select between optimum methods of edge detection in different applications.

  • Describe common distorted images as convolutions of the true image with point spread functions (PSF). Describe and decide under which conditions different image restoration algorithms can be used and describe the strengths and weakness of these algorithms.

  • Describe the Cosine transform and its relationship to the Fourier transform.

  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of wavelets and know how to use them to compress and denoise data.

  • Explain the difference between lossy and lossless compression methods and explain the concept of data redundancy as the source of compression. Describe the subcomponents of general compressor/decompressor algorithms. Calculate theoretical limits to lossless compression using the Shannon noiseless coding theorem and implement Huffman coding.

  • Describe a variety of different mapping functions that can be used to obtain compression and decide when different methods are appropriate.
    Show via examples why Digital Pulse Code Modulation (DPCM) works and is stable in the face of quantisation errors.

  • Describe the main components of the JPEG standard.

  • Write computer code in MATLAB to implement selected image processing algorithms.

Content

Introduction.  Image Enhancement: transform functions, and histogram
equalisation; image smoothing and sharpening; edge detection and noise
reduction; Fourier domain methods.  Continuous and Discrete 2D Fourier
Transforms.  Wavelets and Wavelet Applications.  Image Compression:
general compressor/decompressor, coding theorem, Huffman coding and
multi-pixel coding; run length coding, predictive coding and digital pulse
code modulation; cosine transform, block coding, zonal mask and threshold
mask; JPEG.  Image Restoration: linear space-invariant distortions, point
spread function, inverse and pseudoinverse filters; Wiener filter; image
reconstruction from projections.

Organisation

Lectures, lab exercises, problem classes and project.

Literature

'Digital Image Processing' 3rd edition (2008) by Gonzalez and Woods.

Examination

Project and written exam.


Page manager Published: Thu 04 Feb 2021.