Applied Information Technology

Specializations

  • Digital Representation
  • Higher Education

The graduate school is organised within the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

Director of Graduate Studies: Nir Piterman, Wolfgang Ahrendt

Syllabus

 

(Approved by the President on October 31, 2006. Ref. nr. C2006/1051)
(revised August 24, 2007)
(revised September 30, 2015)

1 Subject description and goals of the programme

Applied Information Technology is a subject matter that combines engineering with social science. It combines theoretical and empirical approaches with methods for professional design of software and interfaces in order to develop innovative IT-artefacts and sound IT-usage in different contexts. Applied Information Technology is concerning the usage of IT, the development of IT, and the organisation of IT. Focus could be on any of these aspects as well as on specific application areas. The aim of the postgraduate education in Applied Information Technology is to give the students:

 

  • Deeper knowledge of IT in general and of the chosen profile area in specific.
  • Practical skill in application development and development methods
  • Deeper knowledge in theories relevant for the subject, and skills in using and developing theories in the individual research work
  • Practical skill in empirical work and research methods relevant for Applied Information Technology, and
  • Skills to participate in written and oral scientific discourse on an international arena

 

2 Requirements for admission

To be admitted to education on doctoral level it is required that the applicant meets the criteria for general and specific entry requirements in accordance with what is stated in the Higher Education Ordinance, Chapter 7, sections 39, and 40. 
A person meets the general entry requirements for doctoral courses and study programmes if he or she:

 

  1. has been awarded a qualification on advanced level,
  2. has satisfied the requirements for courses comprising at least 240 credits of which at least 60 credits were awarded on advanced level, or
  3. has acquired substantially equivalent knowledge in some other way in Sweden or abroad.

The specific entry requirements shall be essential for students to be able to benefit from the course or study programme. The specific requirements for admission to the doctoral programme in Applied Information Technology are:

  • a master’s degree in computer science, computer engineering, or in a design oriented subject of relevance to information technology

 

Equivalent knowledge acquired by other means will also count as qualification.
Applicants from abroad who do not have English or a Scandinavian language as their mother tongue, will normally be required to take an English language test, e.g. TOEFL 550 (paper-based)/TOEFL 213 (computer-based) before admission.

3 The plan of the graduate programme

The PhD program comprises 240 credits and the licentiate program, 120 credits. These correspond to 4 years and 2 years respectively of full time study. One year full time study will correspond to 60 credits.
 
Both programs consist of:

 

  • obligatory courses
  • individual study
  • participation in seminars and guest lectures
  • research or development leading to a scientific dissertation.

 

The student participates in scientific activities through attendance at seminars and guest lectures even if these are not directly related to any part of the formal course requirements. Each postgraduate student must present the results of his or her research at least once a year at a seminar.

4 Specialization

 

The Graduate Education can also be in Applied Information Technology with specialization in Digital Representation, and Higher Education.

5 Courses

 

The course part contains an obligatory component and an individually planned component that is adapted to the student’s research orientation, interests and knowledge profile.
Credits from relevant courses in undergraduate studies may be transferred to the graduate programme. Students with at least 270 credits from their undergraduate studies may transfer a maximum of 30 credits. No credits may be transferred from undergraduate studies amounting to 240 credits. A graduated system of credit transferral will be applied between 240 and 270 credits The main supervisor decides which credits from the undergraduate education that may be counted in the graduate education.

5.1 Mandatory Courses

Doctoral students admitted after September 1, 2012, are required to take 15 credit points from the area of Generic and Transferable Skills during their graduate studies. Generic and Transferable skills (GTS) aims to give doctoral students at Chalmers professional and individual development, and is a program of activities/courses not directly linked to the respective areas of research. Of these, 9 credit points are mandatory for the licentiate degree, and another 6 credit points for the PhD degree.
 
In addition to the courses within Generic and Transferable Skills, the student is also required to participate in the introduction day for doctoral students (before the licentiate examination, at latest). Further requirements are an oral popular science presentation to be performed prior to the PhD thesis defence and a written popular science presentation to be published on the back of the PhD thesis.
 
Get more information:

 


 

The following courses are mandatory for the degree of Licentiate (L) and for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD):
 
                                                                                 L        PhD
Theory of science                                                     7.5      7.5
Research method                                                     6         12
Design of IT-artefacts                                               4.5       7.5
Theoretical perspectives on IT                                 6         12
Ethics                                                                       3         3
Pedagogy                                                                 3         3
General Introduction for Doctoral Students        0         0
Individual study                                                        15        45
Total course requirements                                        45       90

5.2 Individual Study

For profiling within the subject area, the supervisor together with the graduate student determine individual study courses amounting to at least 15 credits for the licentiate and to at least 45 credits for a PhD. The individual study could consist of literature courses as well as relevant elective PhD-courses at Chalmers, Göteborg University or other universities. The individual study is specific to each graduate student and is described in the student’s individual curriculum.

6 Licentiate thesis and Doctoral Dissertation

6.1 Licentiate thesis

In order to obtain the licentiate degree, the graduate student must carry out research work and write a licentiate thesis which describes the work.
 
In the education leading to the licentiate degree, the graduate student’s own research work is of limited extent, but it must still be given such a form that it yields results which can be published internationally.
The licentiate thesis may have the form of a monograph, or of a compilation with a number of scientifically reviewed articles. In the latter case, these articles are to be connected by a so-called ’kappa’ which interrelates the contributions as well as discusses and draws conclusions from the entire work. The individual articles may have been written together with the main supervisor, another supervisor or other persons. Whichever its form, the thesis should have a length corresponding to about 2-3 conference papers and articles of normal length. The articles should maintain such a level that they could be accepted for publication in an international scientific journal or high quality conference with a referee procedure. The thesis is normally to be written in English so that the work can reach an international public and contribute to the international research in the area. The licentiate thesis must be presented in English or Swedish at an open seminar. The thesis is assessed with the mark of either Fail or Pass.

6.2 Doctoral Dissertation

To obtain the doctoral degree, the graduate student must carry out research work and write a thesis which describes the work.
 
The doctoral thesis may have the form of a monograph, or of a compilation with a number of scientifically reviewed articles. In the latter case, these articles are to be connected by a so-called ’kappa’ which interrelates the contributions as well as discusses and draws conclusions from the entire work. In both cases, the thesis should have a length corresponding to about 4-5 conference papers and articles of normal length. The articles should maintain such a level that they could be accepted for publication in an international scientific journal or high quality conference with a referee procedure. The individual articles may have been written together with the main supervisor, another supervisor or other persons. In order to show that the doctoral candidate has attained the intended proficiency, at least one of the articles must have been written by the candidate personally. The thesis is normally to be written in English so that the work can reach an international public and contribute to the international research in the area. The thesis work must be defended orally in English or Swedish at a public disputation. The thesis work is assessed as either Fail or Pass.

7 Degree

The type of degree that can be obtained after completion of the postgraduate studies differs depending on the area of the undergraduate and master level education (Engineering, Philosophy, et cetera).

7.1 Licentiate degree

The requirements for the licentiate degree comprise 120 credits, of which 45 credits are acquired in postgraduate courses and 75 credits in the licentiate thesis.

7.2 Doctoral thesis

The requirements for the doctoral degree comprise 240 credits, of which 90 credits are acquired in postgraduate courses and 150 credits in the PhD thesis.

8 Supervision

Postgraduate students are entitled to supervision: full time students to four years of supervision for the doctoral degree, and to two years for the licentiate degree; part time students obtain the same amount distributed over a proportionally longer time period. When admitted each graduate student is assigned a first year supervisor who accompanies the beginning of his or her study. Each student has an advisory committee which comprises in addition to the supervisor at least two further persons, usually one within and one outside the subject of the dissertation. This committee meets the student at least once per year to discuss progress towards the degree.
 
The management of the department appoints an examiner who, together with the supervisor, determines the individual study courses (see Section 5.2). The examiner fixes the grade at the examination. The examiner and the supervisor can be the same person. The examiner, the supervisor, and the student together work out in the beginning an individual study plan for the student's path of education.

9 Examination on proficiency in the subject

Courses are followed by written and/or oral examinations; the student’s performance is graded Passed (“Godkänd’”) or Not passed (“Icke godkänd”). A doctoral dissertation is graded by a committee, which is specially appointed for each thesis defence. Three months before the planned date of the defense a draft of the dissertation must be given to the director of graduate studies and to the members of the student’s advisory committee.
 
A licentiate thesis is graded by the examiner.

10 Additional guidelines

With full time study, a doctoral degree is normally calculated to take four years, and a licentiate degree two years. The student must present his or her study results and future plans regularly.
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Published: Thu 16 Jan 2020.